Sunday, March 30, 2008

Berens attacked by cheetahs Big Cat Rescue quoted

Cheetahs maul caretaker

Listen to this article or download audio file.Click-2-Listen

By JANE MUSGRAVE

Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

Saturday, March 29, 2008

WELLINGTON — The owner of a wildlife sanctuary was mauled by two cheetahs at the Panther Ridge Sanctuary on Saturday evening while about 20 horrified visitors looked on.

Judy Berens was giving an exhibition with two of the large wildcats around 6 p.m. when one of them became distracted by a ball a child was bouncing outside the enclosure, said Gabriella Ferraro, a spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. As the cheetah ran toward the ball, it knocked its 58-year-old caretaker to the ground. The cats then jumped on her, biting and clawing her repeatedly, she said.


Berens was airlifted to Delray Medical Center for treatment of about 40 puncture wounds to her arms, legs and back, she said. Later in the evening, Berens spoke with a center volunteer and said she was likely to be discharged on Monday.

"She is lucky" Ferraro said.

Two volunteers helped save her from further injury by grabbing hoses and spraying the cats until they released her, she said.

The event that spiraled out of control was part of a fund-raiser Berens was having for the sanctuary that is also known as the Panther Ridge Conservation Center.

Despite the attack no laws were broken, Ferraro said. The cheetahs were returned to their cages and no further action is expected. The cheetahs - 2-year-old males- arrived at the compound about three months ago from South Africa, she said.

Wildlife officials inspected the state-licensed facility earlier this year and found everything in order, she said.

Berens turned her 10-acre farm off 50th Street South into a sanctuary about five years ago. She cares for about 20 abandoned exotic cats, including caracals, jaguars, tigers and panthers.

In 2005, a 500-pound Bengal tiger escaped from its unlatched cage. It was shot with a tranquilizer. It never left the fenced compound.

Florida leads the nation in the number of attacks, maulings and deaths by wild cats, according to a Web site operated by Big Cat Rescue. From 1990 through 2007, 15 adults and five children nationwide have been killed by wild cats and 175 people have been mauled.

In Florida, four people have been killed and 21 mauled in the same 17 years, the group reports. The last fatal attack in Florida occurred in July 2001 when a 500-pound male Siberian tiger at Savage Kingdom in Center Hill, east of Orlando, broke into an adjoining cage and attacked a workman who was making repairs. The facility was shut down in 2006.

Berens gives tours and exhibitions to help defray the costs of caring for the animals. According to her Web site, her annual food bill is $30,000 and her annual vet bill is around $15,000.

In a 2003 interview, Berens said her passion had risks. Further, while an avid lover of the wild animals, she didn't encourage others to follow her lead.

She said she fashioned herself after Katharine Hepburn's leopard-owning character in Bringing up Baby.

"I figured if she can have a leopard, why can't I have an ocelot?" she said.


Carole's note:  Her stupid comment at the end is exactly why displaying big cats as tractable is harmful to people and the cats.  If show biz had not portrayed Hepburn as a master of the leopard, Berens might not have shelled out 7500.00 for her Jaguars that she bought from Lance Ramos, nor the 40,000 she paid for the Cheetahs.  Buying cats is not rescuing them and we figured that out ten years ago.  Exhibiting them as pets, even if you are saying that other people should not, just continues the spiral of abuse caused by supply and demand.

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:


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Saturday, March 29, 2008

Judy Berens Mauled by Cheetah Wellington, FL

Judy Berens Mauled by Cheetah Wellington, FL

48 minutes ago

WELLINGTON, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say the owner of a Florida wildlife sanctuary has been hospitalized after she was attacked by a cheetah.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office says Judy Berens has about 40 puncture wounds to her extremities and back. Authorities say she was airlifted to Delray Medical Center, but it appears she has non-life threatening injuries.

Authorities say Berens owns and operates Panther Ridge Conservation Center, which provides homes for exotic cats.

Authorities say Berens was conducting an exhibition with two male cheetahs in a cage, when one became distracted by a ball being bounced outside. The cheetah moved toward the ball quickly and knocked her to the ground. The cheetah then pounced on her and began biting and clawing her. Several people entered the enclosure and rescued her.

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:


This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
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Friday, March 28, 2008

Tiger kills villager in Nagbhid Forest

Tiger kills villager in Nagbhid Forest
25 Mar 2008, 0323 hrs IST,

CHANDRAPUR: In yet another incident of tiger attack, a villager was killed in the protected area of Nagbhid forest range under North Chandrapur Forest Circle on Monday morning.

Kashinath Suryawanshi (50) became the sixth human to have been killed by the big cat in Chandrapur district so far this year. He had gone to the jungle with his family members to collect leaves of the Palash tree, which are used to make leaf-plates (patrawali).

Sources said Suryawanshi, a resident of Jankapur village in Nagbhid tehsil, had gone to the forest under Mindala beat, close to the nearby Adyal Mendha village on Monday morning. Around 11 am, while the entire family had scattered in the forest to collect Palash leaves, the tiger attacked Suryawanshi, killing him on the spot.

Alerted by the loud noise, other family members rushed to the spot. And, before the tiger could drag away Suryawanshi's body deep into the jungle, the members started raised an alarm that scared the tiger away. Later, the Suryawanshis reached Adyal Mendha village and reported the incident to the forest department.

"The tiger attacked Suryawanshi from behind and he must have been instantly killed. Injury marks were found on his neck and we have recovered tiger pugmarks on the spot," said Rahul Sorte, RFO, Talodhi forest range, who was amongst the officials who performed inquest on the spot. He said an ex-gratia of Rs 2,000 had been given to the family as instant financial help, while compensation as per norms would be provided after completion of formalities. He also confirmed that there had been a similar incident in the same area in August last year, in which a villager was injured. However, it is entirely different area from Talodhi forest range, where last year a tiger had created menace, Sorte clarified.

This is seventh incident of tiger attack on human in the district this year, in which six persons have lost their lives while one was seriously injured.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Nagpur/Tiger_kills_villager_in_Nagbhid_Forest/articleshow/2896568.cms
 



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Inquiry Critiques Zoo’s Response to Tiger Attack

Inquiry Critiques Zoo's Response to Tiger Attack
By Mike Nizza

From the outside, a tiger's escape from its enclosure at the San Francisco Zoo may have seemed beyond reality. From the inside, it was not only real; it meant work to do.

Assessing the results was the job of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, a group that sets and enforces standards at more than 200 zoos in North America. After interviewing many of the employees involved in the incident in San Francisco, the A.Z.A. said that the zoo's response was "impressive," though it cited "some exceptions" summarized by The San Francisco Chronicle:

Most employees had been sent home before the zoo closed; a security supervisor didn't believe initial reports that a dangerous animal had escaped; and a zookeeper responding to the incident couldn't find keys needed to access a shotgun.

The report also slams zoo managers for not properly training some employees.

According to the A.Z.A.'s accounting [pdf], the zoo has addressed many of the weaknesses brought to light by the incident, in which a 17-year-old boy was killed and two of his friends were wounded. However, the inquiry steered clear of a question that may be the most burning: Did the boys taunt the tiger, as the police suspect? No charges were ever filed in the case; lawyers for the boys have vowed to sue the zoo.

Two zoo employees who were harshly criticized in the report were unavailable for interviews with investigators. Ray Lim, the head of one of the zoo's eateries, refused to allow the boys inside, assuming that they had been fighting with other humans rather than the tiger. One of the boys was bleeding from his head and the other was "very belligerent," another zoo official said.

In fact, they were telling the truth about having gotten away from the tiger just minutes beforehand. But they were kept outside the cafe until the arrival of a seasonal zoo employee named Galo Paz, who had heard on a radio that the boys needed first aid. The investigators determined that Mr. Paz had acted unsatisfactorily, since he was not ordered to go to the scene.

In the end, police officers, not zoo employees, shot the loose tiger, which was named Tatiana. The report provides a terrifying account of her final moments at an outdoor cafe where she found Mr. Paz and the two friends of the boy she killed (the two friends were brothers):

While standing with the uninjured brother, Paz sees the tiger approaching the uninjured brother from behind. Both Paz and the uninjured brother slowly back away. The tiger approaches both of them and swipes at their legs knocking the uninjured brother down. Paz runs away in the opposite direction passing SFPD cars on the way headed toward the Terrace Cafe.

The San Francisco Police escorted by Zookeeper Brown turn the corner in the police car at the rhino exhibit to discover the tiger sitting in front of the entrance to the Terrace Café, facing one injured guest who is sitting alone supported by his arms with legs outstretched in front of him on the sidewalk facing the tiger. The tiger looks at the police car arriving and pounces on the young man pushing him on his back to the ground. Additional San Francisco police arrive to the opposite side of the Terrace Café by car from the front gate as the first car of police observes the tiger jumping onto the victim. Radio calls are heard saying "Blue on blue," meaning police in a crossfire. Shots are heard. Fourteen 40-caliber pistol shell casings are recovered in front of the café afterward. As the tiger leaves the victim and approaches the open police car both officers jump back in the car in which Zookeeper Brown is riding in the back seat.

The tiger falls to the ground next to the open passenger door from which the officer was firing his handgun.
The full report was posted by The Chronicle as a pdf document.

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/03/19/inquiry-critiques-zoos-response-t...
 



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Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Carole's Letter RE Horseshoe Creek

Dear Maya,

There is no reason to feel sorry for Darryl Atkinson.  He has claimed to other reporters that he bred more than 60 of the big cats at Horseshoe Creek.  He always has plenty of baby tigers and baby lions on hand to support himself through offering them for photo opportunities.  This has never even come close to being a legitimate sanctuary.  See SanctuaryStandards.com or TAOSanctuaries.org for a list of accredited sanctuaries.  The real shame here is that it took the government so long to do anything, but the public pressure to put an end to the charade has finally brought the abuse to an end.

It is sad for the animals who will be unable to find new homes, or better homes because most of the places that will take them are no better than where they are leaving.  The humane answer is to end the captive breeding of these animals that are not involved in any legitimate Species Survival Plan (those are only in AZA accredited zoos.)  Until the breeding, using and discarding stops, this heartbreaking situation will continue to replicate.  The animals are the victims here; not the person who collected them and bred more and more of them every year.  

You can find out more about Horseshoe Creek's history in the news at http://www.911animalabuse.com/00abusers/Horseshoe%20Creek%20Darryl%20Atkinson.htm

Thank you for bringing the article to the attention of the public and hopefully others will look more closely before supporting places who claim to be rescuing animals when clearly that is not the case.  Ten years ago we bred animals because people, including Darryly Atkinson, assured us we were saving endangered species for the future.  Thanks to the Internet, we learned better and anyone who is breeding exotic cats knows better by now, unless they live in a vacuum.  
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:


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Horseshoe Creek Closes to The Public

Horseshoe Creek Closes to The Public

Founder Darryl Atkinson loses license to keep big cats, other animals.

By MAYA CARPENTER 
NEWS CHIEF 
DAVENPORT | 

Darryl Atkinson did not have a choice. Horseshoe Creek Wildlife Sanctuary has closed to the public.

Atkinson, founder and director of the sanctuary, is losing his license because he did not meet federal requirements for keeping large animals, such as tigers and bears.

The papers were signed last week and Horseshoe Creek closed to the public Sunday.

His state license is good until September, but without an exhibitor's license, he can't keep the facility open.

"The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has been trying to close us down for nine years and they finally succeeded," Atkinson said.

Atkinson has been waging an uphill battle to keep open the refuge for unwanted predatory animals, as well as other animals.

It costs between $6,000 and $8,000 per month to run the facility, and Atkinson hasn't made that much money in the past six months.

"We brought in about $2,000 in the last two months," he said.

The refuge has 60 animals that will need a place to live - that has been the hardest task, Atkinson said.

"The alternative is for them to be euthanized," he said.

That's the last thing he wants to happen.

Atkinson has found a couple of places for some of the animals.

One of the 20 tigers has been sent to Alligator Farm in St. Augustine, he said.

He has four black bears and five lions that are older, which makes them difficult to place.

He also said he doesn't have any money to transport the animals to other facilities.

Friends of Atkinson said they don't understand the action to close the facility.

"I don't understand how it is for the betterment of animals (to close the sanctuary)," said Michele Clark, a Winter Haven resident and former sanctuary volunteer.

Atkinson agrees, saying he knows that there are probably more facilities that look better than his, but he cares about the animals just as much as any other animal facility, he said.

"He's put the animals before his own comfort and pleasures," said Velma Daniels, a Winter Haven resident.

Atkinson bought the five acres between 1978 and 1982 for the sanctuary while working with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus as an assistant elephant trainer.

He purchased his first leopard in 1983, which he trained for use in movies and stage shows. Then in 1984, a tiger was brought in for refuge.

He's been sheltering homeless animals ever since.

Horseshoe Creek Wildlife Foundation is a nonprofit organization that started 1984 and was incorporated in 1994.

At its height, Horseshoe Creek Wildlife Sanctuary - named for the creek that passes along the property's boundaries - was home to more than 80 animals, including 40 big cats: lions, tigers, leopards, cougars, bobcats, Florida panthers and ligers, which are a combination of a tiger and a lion. Atkinson also gave a home to bears, wolves, monkeys, deer, lemurs, a variety of reptiles and mammals.

But since 1999, Atkinson has been in a tug-of-war with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission over the conditions his animals live in.

In 2003, Atkinson had more than 20 violation with keeping his tigers in cages that are too small. In 2006, he was charged for failure to meet minimum wildlife cage requirements. In February, Conservation Commission investigators found two cage violations. In one, a tiger was found in a 13-foot-by-13-foot cage, constructed of 11-gauge wire with no safety entrance. State requirements call for a 10-foot-by-24-square-foot cage, which is 41 square feet larger, and built of heavier 9-gauge wire with a safety entrance.

In May 2007, he pleaded no contest to 12 counts of maintaining wildlife in unsafe conditions. He was ordered to pay a $267 fine and agreed not to take in any more animals until he could show he had the money needed to maintain the sanctuary.

Atkinson has given up his life for the facility and said he is disappointed that he has to see it go away. "I spent the last 30 years caring for animals," he said. "I have gone without food so they can eat."



Maya Carpenter is a News Chief staff writer. She can be reached atmaya.carpenter@newschief.com or 863-401-6977. Material from Ledger staff writers Donna Kelly and Shoshana Walters was used in this report. 

***

More about Darryl Atkinson here:


He claims to have bred more than 60 leopards and always has plenty of baby lions and tigers on hand for his photo booths.

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457


Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:


This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused
by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Saturday, March 22, 2008

Tiger Attack Response Gets Mixed Review

Tiger Attack Response Gets Mixed Review

By MARCUS WOHLSEN
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The organization that accredits the nation's zoos is chiding San Francisco Zoo workers for not believing two brothers who said a tiger was on the loose and had mauled their friend. But its report, released Tuesday by the zoo, praises the institution's overall response to the fatal December attacks.

Inspectors from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums called the actions of the zoo staff following the first reports of the tiger's escape on Christmas Day "impressive."

But the report also criticizes the zoo's security supervisor for doubting the brothers, including one who was bleeding from the head, that a big cat had escaped. Association inspectors also found that because of the holiday, most of the zoo's workers had been sent home early, leaving too few staffers.

Responding to calls that the men were at a zoo cafe seeking medical attention, the supervisor arrived to find that brothers Paul and Kulbir Dhaliwal of San Jose "are behaving erratically, possibly intoxicated," according to the inspection report's timeline of the incident.

The supervisor assumed there had been a fight and "does not believe that a big cat is out because of the erratic and belligerent behavior of the two guests," the report said.

By that time, the 250-pound Siberian tiger had already killed 17-year-old Carlos Sousa Jr. outside its enclosure and was roaming the zoo grounds. Minutes later, it attacked the brothers, who were kept outside the cafe by a manager who lacked a zoo radio and didn't know a tiger had escaped, the report said.

Inspectors also found that the one zookeeper on the scene who was trained as a shooter in animal escapes did not have keys to where a shotgun was stored. He was able to retrieve the weapon only with the help of a veterinarian who had left for the day and returned because she had forgotten to complete a report.

The tiger was fatally shot by police about 20 minutes after the brothers first reported they had been attacked, according to police and zoo timelines.

The attacks came just over a year after the same tiger devoured the arm of a zookeeper during a feeding.

"The zoo is too often chasing problems rather than proactively addressing known concerns," the report said. "This will require a shift in culture and the supervisory and maintenance staff to make it happen."

The report was released by the zoo and represents its most detailed account of the attacks. According to association spokesman Steve Feldman, the zoo's release consists of excerpts of the complete report, which remains confidential between the group and the zoo.

"They've accurately summarized the findings from those documents," Feldman said. "The fact that we've maintained the zoo's accreditation also speaks for itself."


http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hnDuXiwv-9m74-kPrGUFDKn3BMNgD8VG7EPG0
 



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Thursday, March 20, 2008

Lion mauls martial arts instructor

The lion could not have been more than a year or so old by his size
and mane. They are kittens until they are 3-5 years old.

March 20, 2008 Ontario, Canada Bowmanville Zoo: A martial arts teacher
knocked over by a lion during a photo shoot for Desi Life at
Bowmanville Zoo says she is happy to have come away with four broken
ribs and a bloodied lung. "To be honest, the sensation I have is a
great deal of gratitude to be alive," Gitanjali Kolanad said
yesterday. In the video, one minder kicks the baby lion in the neck
while the other pulls on a leash. The lion takes a second,
unsuccessful lunge at Kolanad as she lies gasping, before he is hauled
out the door. "I couldn't breathe – that was the terrifying part. The
muscles in my chest seized up and they didn't relax until I was in the
emergency room and they gave me a muscle relaxant." See it here: http://www.thestar.com/DesiLife/article/347684

For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL 33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org MakeADifference@BigCatRescue.org

Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above. You are
hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or
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the information contained in this communication is strictly
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recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the
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Monday, March 17, 2008

Tiger kills woman in Dhorar, efforts on to declare it a ‘man-eater’

Tiger kills woman in Dhorar, efforts on to declare it a 'man-eater'

Manish Sahu
Posted online: Saturday , March 15, 2008 at 11:14:54
Updated: Friday , March 14, 2008 at 11:36:31

Lucknow, March 14

A Tiger, which had earlier killed a boy, has killed a young woman today in the Dhorar Forest Range. The partial body of the unidentified woman was found outside Bhuvapur village in the morning after people noticed a trail of blood and pugmark of the tiger.

The recent incident has prompted the Lakhimpur Kheri Forest Division to initiate the process of declaring the tiger as a man-eater.

"We have sent a letter to the Principal Chief Conservator of Forest (Wildlife) and Chief Wildlife Warden DNS Suman requesting to declare the tiger a man-eater," said North Kheri Divisional Forest Officer KK Singh.

Besides attacking and killing humans, the tiger has also killed four animals, a dog, a cow and two buffaloes, in the last two-and-a-half months.

The forest officials said that since tiger is a protected animal, it could be declared a man-eater only after prolonged efforts to trap the big cat fail.

The residents of Dhorar Forest Range have been asked to remain alert and teams of experts have been called to trap the animal. Singh said that he was sure that the tiger is still in the open fields of the village.

In the past, officials had tried to trap the animal but without any success. "We have been on our toes for the last two months. We have seen the tiger in the area several times, but every time it managed to escape," said an official.

The hunt for the tiger picked momentum after it attacked two children — Shiv Kumari Devi (10) and Suresh Rajpurt — on February 24 in Baniyapura village. But when villagers made noise, the tiger left the children and fled. Both children were injured, but survived. On January 26, the same tiger had killed a 14-year-old boy Umesh.

http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/Tiger-kills-woman-in-Dhorar-efforts-on-to-declare-it-a-maneater/284533/
 



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Sunday, March 02, 2008

Tiger injures woman in Sundarbans

Tiger injures woman in Sundarbans

March 2nd, 2008 - 12:54 am ICT

Kolkata, March 1 (IANS) A woman who had gone fishing in West Bengal's Sundarban creek was injured by a tiger Saturday, a senior forest official said. Gayetri Sardar, a housewife of Shyamnagar village under South 24 Parganas district of Sundarbans, had gone with her neighbours to catch fish and crabs in the narrow water channels, about 120 km from here, when the tiger attacked her.

"She was attacked by the tiger near Herobhaya canal. She had ventured deep inside the tiger reserve area with fishing nets. Suddenly a tiger pounced on her from the back and caused injuries," West Bengal Principal Chief Conservator of Forest (PCCF) Atanu Raha said.

He said the other members of the fishing team, who accompanied Gayetri, shouted out and the man-eater fled the scene out of fear.

"They took the injured to the Kultali forest beat office and later she was admitted to the Jamatala Block Hospital in Sundarbans with the help of forest officials. She is under medical observation and, according to doctors, she is now out of danger," Raha said.

Sundarban, a vast tract of forest and saltwater swamp, is formed at the lower part of the Ganges Delta extending about 260 km along the Bay of Bengal from the Hooghly River Estuary in India to the Meghna River Estuary in Bangladesh.

Raha said the woman had gone to a prohibited area. "There's also a strict restriction on the fishermen to enter these areas for catching fish," he said.

In the recent weeks, two tigers strayed out of the forest area and entered villages. Both were later captured. While one was released in the wild again, another injured tiger was shifted to Kolkata for treatment in the zoo hospital.

Related Stories:

Stray Sundarbans tiger captured by forest officials (February 22, 2008)
Pregnant tigress climbs palm tree in Bengal village (February 18, 2008)
Wounded Sundarbans tiger under treatment in Kolkata zoo (February 23, 2008)
Captured tigress returned to the wild (February 19, 2008)
West Bengal forest officials trap a stray tiger (February 23, 2008)
Tiger with bullet injuries under treatment (February 19, 2008)
Angry Bengalis drive a tigress up a tree (February 19, 2008)
Tiger skins seized, two held in Kerala (February 16, 2008)
Red alert in Jim Corbett Tiger Reserve during the festive season (January 2, 2008)
Tiger under treatment in Bhopal dies (February 23, 2008)


http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/enviornment/tiger-injures-woman-in-sundarbans_10023030.html



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After leopards, a tiger attack in Nashik

After leopards, a tiger attack in Nashik

Vaishali Balajiwale
Sunday, March 02, 2008 03:21

ISTNASHIK: While the leopards have chosen Nashik as their abode, tigers also seem to indicate their preference for the area.If the youth who was attacked by a wildcat in Mhasruli, near Trimbakeshwar, near Nashik is to be believed, he was attacked by a black striped wild cat!

Vijay Tambe, 22, had gone to visit his uncle Shantaram at his farm on Feb 29, 2008. The story goes that as Vijay was leaving his house in the afternoon to return to Nashik, a wild animal pounced on him from the right side. A frightened Vijay began to scream and by the time his uncle and other villagers emerged, the animal had also gone for Vijay's neck. In the commotion, the animal ran away, Tambe says.

Going by the description of Vijay and the villagers, the animal was about 5 to 6 feet long and 2.5 feet tall and has prominent black strips.

The villagers say that a tiger had been sited in the area in the days preceding the attack and had informed the local forest officer.

"We are not sure if it is a tiger. This is what villagers have reported. We have put a cage in the area to trap the animal," says Warungase, range forest officer, Trimbakeshwar.

http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?newsid=1153836
 



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