Monday, March 30, 2009

Teen Attacked By Tiger Files Lawsuit against Branson West Business

Teen Attacked By Tiger Files Lawsuit against Branson West Business

By KSPR News Story Updated: Mar 26, 2009

The family of the teenager who was attacked by a tiger last summer is now taking a Branson-area attraction to court. Sixteen-year-old Dakoda Wood is suing the Branson Interactive Zoo and Aquarium, formerly known as Predator World. A tiger bit Wood on the neck, damaging his spinal cord.

Wood’s attorneys say the attack caused paralysis and injury to his whole body. Now Wood’s attorneys want to hold the tiger's owners responsible. The civil suit defendants are Breck Wakefield, Branson West Entertainment, Inc, and Tia’s World LLC. The suit states all three operated and controlled the Branson Interactive Zoo and Aquarium.

Wood's attorneys claim Missouri law hold's the Branson Interactive Zoo and Aquarium responsible for his injuries because they harbored the wild animal. Injuries the lawsuit claims will cause Wood to suffer a diminished capacity for work, labor and pleasure for the rest of his life.

Employees told KSPR last August, the tigers tried to save Wood. They also said Wood broke policy when he went into the cage alone to take a picture of the animals for a customer. They say he'd known the tigers since they were cubs.

Wood's attorneys say the business is responsible because the business failed to train and supervise the 16-year-old. They claim the business also failed to restrain the tiger. The lawsuit states Wood has and will pay numerous medical bills because of the attack. Attorneys claim he has also suffered anxiety of the body and mind.

Employees told KSPR they opened the business the day after the attack because that is what Wood and his family would have wanted. According to the lawsuit the family wants the tigers’ owner to be held responsible.

KSPR tried to contact Wood and his three attorneys today. Each of Wood’s attorneys were in court for other cases. KSPR also called the Branson Interactive Zoo and Aquarium's attorney. He said he did not have time to comment.

http://www.kspr.com/news/local/41944747.html

http://www.bigcatrescue.org

Sunday, March 22, 2009

Ranthambore tiger strays, attacks woman

Ranthambore tiger strays, attacks woman

22 Mar 2009, 0511 hrs IST, Anindo Dey, TNN

JAIPUR: A two-year-old male tiger strayed from the Ranthambore National Park and attacked a woman at Kutalpura village near Mirza Ghati on Saturday morning. The woman has been admitted to a hospital and is said to be stable.

According to sources in the forest department, the tiger had been roaming around the fringe areas of the park for the past 15 days. "This morning it strayed into a village chasing a prey and on seeing the woman close by, attacked her," the official said.

The woman was saved by the villagers after she raised an alarm. The tiger later attacked a forest guard, Mohan Lal, as well, leaving him injured.

"There was utter confusion and panic-striken villagers were running helter-skelter as the tiger was still at large in the village and no one knew where exactly it was. When word reached us, we rushed to the spot by 7 am. The tiger, which was hiding in a bush, was difficult to spot but within half a hour we managed to locate it," said a senior forest official of the national park.

Then it was a question of firing a tranquiliser dart and capturing the tiger. But this proved a difficult task, especially with the villagers being in complete panic. It was only around 1 pm that forest officials could tranquilise the tiger. Later, forest officials took the tiger to the relatively unoccupied Sawai Man Singh sanctuary adjoining the park and released it there.

"This is a sub-adult tiger and our aim in releasing it at the Sawai Man Singh sanctuary is to help it mark its territory there so that it settles down," said R N Mehrotra, chief wildlife warden of Rajasthan.

He ruled out the possibility of the tiger turning into a maneater. "This is a young, fit adult and it only injured the woman. Old tigers turn maneaters as they are incapable of hunting other prey. But if they are not injured, human flesh is the last thing that they want," he added.

Mehrotra said the tiger will be fitted with a radio collar so that a better check could be kept on it. "The straying of the tiger to the village was due to what we call the edge effect. Animals often stray into these areas as there is a lot of crop and tigers in a bid to catch prey land up in the villages," he said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Cities/Ranthambore-tiger-strays-attacks-woman/articleshow/4298085.cms

http://www.bigcatrescue.org/

Friday, March 20, 2009

Tiger in shed, bobcat in box

Update 3/20/09: We have just learned that Tigger the tiger and Bella the bobcat have both been placed at a licensed facility in FL, but the FWC inspector wouldn't say where. She did say that it was not at Vanishing Species. She described the new facility as a good place, but she seemed to see no problem with where they were at Diane Zandman's, in a shed and an undersized cage, so that isn't saying much.

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org
SaveTheBigCats@gmail.com

Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused
by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Keepers shoot escaped lion at Australian zoo

21 hours ago

SYDNEY (AFP) — A lioness was shot dead after escaping from its enclosure at an Australian zoo, forcing dozens of visitors to hide inside buildings, a zoo spokesman said Wednesday.

The nine-year-old big cat, called Jamelia, broke out of its habitat at Mogo Zoo south of Sydney on Tuesday morning as visitors were walking around.

"She never reached a public area but there was a concern she may have," zoo spokesman John Appleby said.

"All our team members and visitors were taken into safe houses."

He said Jamelia, who was raised from birth at the privately-owned zoo some 300 kilometres (185 miles) south of Sydney, was shot dead by a marksman.

"She was moving quite slowly toward a public area, but under the circumstances a decision was made to put her down," he told Australian Associated Press.

"It's an absolute loss, the team are still quite upset," he added. "She was a very important animal and loved by the entire team."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iCIp47yScK52t06Bo0iuqX2l_g_A

---------

Learn more about big cats and Big Cat Rescue at http://www.bigcatrescue.org

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Big Cat Rescue on Front Page of Tampa Tribune Today

Are You Living Next To An Exotic Animal?

Photo from Carole Baskin

Tampa's Big Cat Rescue is among the 400 Florida locations where people keep animals requiring a license.

Published: March 17, 2009

Updated: 05:00 am

Related Links

TAMPA - Susan Williams lives among cattle ranches and a growing number of new homes.

So she was more than a little surprised a couple years ago when rumors circulated that her neighbor had a tiger and a grizzly bear on his Okeechobee property.

Williams' curiosity led her to call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Sure enough, the neighbor had permits for a tiger, a grizzly and four other bears.

"I was astounded," Williams said. "I couldn't believe he didn't have to tell us that these animals were out there."

The wildlife commission is tweaking its requirements for people who own exotic animals, and Williams is among a group pushing for neighborhood notification when people have exotic and dangerous species.

Many of the most dangerous animals in Florida aren't in zoos or sanctuaries. They are in people's houses, at fledgling private animal attractions or in once-rural settings now surrounded by subdivisions.

The risks of living next to dangerous species have been on people's minds since a pet chimpanzee in Connecticut attacked a 55-year-old woman on Feb. 16. Closer to home, former Lowry Park Zoo President Lex Salisbury made nationwide news in April when 15 patas monkeys escaped from the exotic animal park he is building north of Lakeland.

More than 400 Florida businesses and individuals have Class I or Class II permits required for the most wild and lethal species. These permit holders can have animals including lions and elephants, alligators and monkeys. The Tampa Bay area is home to more than 30 licenses, including Lowry Park Zoo, Big Cat Rescue and a 7-acre refuge where a Tampa woman has a cougar and a leopard.

Three years of public hearings over the rule changes fueled tension between some animal owners who wish to keep their collections private and neighbors fearful of dangerous species living so close to residential areas.

Some of the 14 proposed changes are less controversial, such as changing the American alligator to a Class II animal.

For now, at least, Williams' neighborhood notification is not among the proposed changes.

Wildlife officials decided notification wouldn't do much good because neighborhood objections aren't grounds for denying a permit, said Capt. Linda Harrison, a commission spokeswoman.

Instead, the commission focused on setting strict criteria for the most dangerous species, such as requiring a minimum of 5 acres, property that allows commercial uses, and a host of fencing and caging stipulations.

Gini Valbuena shares the fears of many animal owners. She worries that notification will breed curiosity among thrill-seekers who might scale fences for a look at the exotic species, risking injury and potentially terrorizing the animals.

More fundamentally, she says, it's her business what she does on her own property. So long as she has the necessary permits and follows the laws, it's nobody else's business, she says.

"I don't think animals should be in the same classification as sexual predators in terms of notification," said Valbuena, who owns two chimpanzees she rents for parties and one-on-one encounters. "It's a total invasion."

Valbuena said she had problems with a neighbor who tormented her chimps and regularly complained to authorities about the animals.

After 28 years in her home, she moved her chimps to Sarasota a few weeks ago.

Deborah Cazin has a cougar and leopard on 7 acres in an upscale area just south of the Avila Golf & Country Club.

She gets the exotic cats when the state seizes them from owners who either run out of money or aren't able to care for the animals. She has taken in primates and other exotic species as well.

In her 30 years working with exotic cats, the only one to escape was a serval, about the size of a bobcat. She quickly captured the cat and returned it to its cage.

Cazin said exotic animals should be kept in rural areas like her property on Lake Byrd, which is zoned for agriculture. "I don't think they should be in people's backyards."

Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, said she worries wildlife officials will appease some animal owners by relaxing a law that requires people who exhibit exotic animals to carry a $10,000 bond to pay for damages.

Big Cat Rescue is aware of 584 incidents since 1990 involving captive exotic cats in the United States. Those confrontations resulted in the deaths of 16 adults and five children, along with the mauling of 193 people.

Like Williams, Baskin worries that hurricanes and other natural disasters could damage cages and fencing, sending deadly animals into neighborhoods among unknowing residents.

This week, she sent a letter to neighbors of exotic animal owners stressing the dangers of living next to cougars, tigers, cobras and black mambas.

"Keeping wild animals in private collections is cruel to the animals and dangerous for you," she wrote.

Baskin plans to forward neighbors' comments and concerns to wildlife officials before the board makes its final decision on the changes June 17 and 18 in Crystal River.

Tired of your creature?

You can surrender exotic pets you no longer want, free of charge and with no questions asked, during a one-day-only event in Miami. Efforts will be made to find homes for pets that are healthy. Exotic reptiles, amphibians, birds, fish and mammals will be accepted. Domestic pets - dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets - will not. The amnesty day will be 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Miami MetroZoo, 12400 S.W. 152nd St., off Florida's Turnpike southeast of Miami.

Reporter Baird Helgeson can be reached at (813) 259-7668.

Post your comments at:

http://www2.tbo.com/content/2009/mar/17/170500/na-neighbors-oh-my/

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org
SaveTheBigCats@gmail.com

Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused
by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Friday, March 13, 2009

Should Neighbors Know When Dangerous Animals Move In?

Should Neighbors Know When Dangerous Animals Move In?

Published: March 13, 2009


Susan Williams lives among cattle ranches and a growing number of new homes.

So she was more than a little surprised a couple years ago when rumors circulated that her neighbor had a tiger and a grizzly bear on his Okeechobee property.

Williams' curiosity led her to call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Sure enough, the neighbor had permits for a tiger, a grizzly and four other bears.

"I was astounded," Williams said. "I couldn't believe he didn't have to tell us that these animals were out there."

The wildlife commission is tweaking its requirements for those who own exotic species, and Williams is among a group pushing for neighborhood notification when people have exotic and dangerous species.

Many of the most dangerous animals in Florida aren't in zoos or sanctuaries. They are in people's houses, at fledgling private animal attractions, or in once-rural settings now surrounded by subdivisions.

More than 400 Florida businesses and individuals have Class I or Class II permits, which allow for the most wild and lethal species. These permit-holders can have animals including lions and elephants, alligators and monkeys. The Tampa Bay area is home to more than 30 licenses, including Lowry Park Zoo, Big Cat Rescue and a seven-acre refuge where a Tampa woman has a cougar and a leopard.

Three years of public hearings over the rule changes fueled a growing tension between some animal owners who wish to keep their collections private and neighbors fearful of dangerous species living so close to residential areas.

Some of the 14 proposed changes are less controversial, like changing the American alligator to a Class II animal.

For now, at least, Williams' neighborhood notification is not among the proposed changes.

Wildlife officials decided notification wouldn't do much good because neighborhood objections aren't grounds for denying a permit, said Capt. Linda Harrison, a commission spokeswoman.

Instead, the commission focused on setting strict criteria for those wanting the most dangerous species, like requiring a minimum of 5 acres, property that allows commercial uses, and a host of fencing and caging requirements.

Gini Valbuena shares the fears of many animal owners. She worries notification would breed curiosity among thrill-seekers who might scale fences for a look at the exotic species, risking injury and potentially terrorizing the animals.

More fundamentally, she says, it's her business what she does on her own property. So long as she has the necessary permits and follows the laws, it's nobody else's business.

"I don't think animals should be in the same classification as sexual predators in terms of notification," said Valbuena, who owns two chimpanzees she rents for parties and one-on-one encounters. "It's a total invasion."

Valbuena said she had problems with a neighbor who tormented her chimps and regularly complained to authorities about the animals.

After 28 years in her home, she moved her chimps to Sarasota a few weeks ago.

Deborah Cazin has a cougar and the leopard on 7 acres in an upscale area just south of the Avila Golf and Country Club.

She gets the exotic cats when the state seizes them from other owners who either run out of money or aren't able to care for the animals. She has taken in primates and other exotic species over the years, as well.

In her 30 years working with exotic cats, the only one to escape was a serval, about the size of a bobcat. She quickly captured the cat and returned it to its cage.

Cazin said exotic animals should only be kept in rural areas, like her property on Lake Byrd, which is zoned for agriculture. "I don't think they should be in people's backyards."

Carole Baskin, founder of Big Cat Rescue in Tampa, said she worries wildlife officials will appease animal owners by relaxing a law that requires those who exhibit exotic animals to carry a $10,000 bond to pay for damages.

Big Cat Rescue is aware of 584 incidents since 1990 involving captive exotic cats in the U.S. Those confrontations resulted in the deaths of 16 adults and five children, along with the mauling of 193 people.

Like Williams, Baskin worries hurricanes and other natural disasters could damage cages and fencing, sending deadly animals into the neighborhoods of unknowing residents.

This week, she sent a letter to neighbors of exotic animal owners stressing the dangers of living next to cougars, tigers, cobras and black mambas.

"Keeping wild animals in private collections is cruel to the animals and dangerous for you," she wrote.

Baskin plans to forward neighbors' comments and concerns to wildlife officials before the board makes its final decision on the changes June 17 and 18 in Crystal River.

Reporter Baird Helgeson can be reached at (813) 259-7668.

http://www2.tbo.com/content/2009/mar/13/should-neighbors-know-when-dangerous-animals-move/

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org
SaveTheBigCats@gmail.com

Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused
by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.




Monday, March 09, 2009

Tiger handler hurt in rough play at Australia Zoo

Tiger handler hurt in rough play at Australia Zoo

By Glenis Green
March 09, 2009 03:42pm

A TIGER handler needed stitches to an arm gash after being scratched by a Sumatran tiger in a play session at Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast.

Zoo director Wes Mannion confirmed today that the handler had been injured late yesterday and taken to hospital for "about two stitches" before being released.

Mr Mannion said the tiger was a young male called Juma, which had been hand raised at the zoo since arriving as a cub and the scratch was part of a rougher than usual playtime, not an attack.

He said the handler was doing well and would make a full recovery.

The tiger incident follows a January scare at the zoo when a reptile handler required treatment in Nambour General Hospital after being bitten by a brown snake while he was trying to feed it a mouse.

Mr Mannion said that handler had made a full recovery and been back at his job after about a week.

http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,27574,25160549-3102,00.html

http://www.bigcatrescue.org

Saturday, March 07, 2009

Tiger kills man who jumps into enclosure in China

Tiger kills man who jumps into enclosure in China

Published: March 08, 2009, 08:16

BEIJING (AP) — A Siberian tiger at a wildlife park near Beijing attacked and killed a man who climbed into its enclosure thinking he found a shortcut down from the Great Wall, a park official said Sunday.

The 20-year-old man, surnamed Guo, had been hiking with two other people on the wall when the group decided to jump down to save time on the descent — unknowingly landing themselves in Badaling Wildlife World's tiger enclosure.

The tiger pounced on Guo, knocking him down and clamping its jaws around his throat, said a wildlife officer who gave only his surname Wang. Guo was killed instantly.

A park ranger who saw the attack chased the tiger in a jeep until it released the body, while the other two men escaped by clambering up a fence and out of the enclosure, Wang said.

"The men ignored all the warning signs and jumped over the protective fences," Wang said.

The two men who escaped told police they had seen signs around the enclosure cautioning of predatory animals but did not believe the warnings because they could not see any, the Beijing Times newspaper reported.

The Siberian tiger, also known as the Amur, Manchurian or Ussuri tiger, is one of the world's rarest species. They are the largest of the big cats, weighing up to 500 pounds (226 kilograms). There are believed to be about 400 of the critically endangered animals in the wild.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jjJck2R8Pd75WzkF_BC5VXL4RwZgD96PKN1O0

http://www.bigcatrescue.org/

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Tiger kills 9th man in Indonesia

Tiger kills 9th man in Indonesia

March 4, 2009

JAKARTA - A TIGER mauled to death an illegal logger on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, an official said on Wednesday, the ninth such death in the last five weeks.
The man, killed on Tuesday night in Jambi province, is the latest victim in a string of attacks that also claimed the lives of two illegal loggers on Sunday, provincial conservation agency head Didi Wuryanto told AFP.

'The village head told me that a group of illegal loggers wanted to secretly transport the victim's body out of the forest. They didn't want to be caught breaking the law,' Mr Wuryanto said.

Villagers have trapped and killed four of the endangered tigers in response to the string of deadly attacks, which conservationists say are largely caused by illegal logging in tiger habitats.

Human-animal conflicts are a rising problem as people encroach on wildlife habitats in Indonesia, an archipelago nation with some of the world's largest remaining tropical forests.

An 83-year-old man was also trampled to death on Wednesday by a herd of around 30 elephants that stormed into a village in neighbouring Riau province, the local conservation agency said.

Mr Wuryanto said provincial authorities met Wednesday to discuss preventive measures aimed at defending villagers and protecting the big cats from human reprisals.

'We won't discuss how to stop tigers from wandering the forests, because that's their habitat, but we need to find immediate solution to avoid more victims,' he said.

There are less than 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild, according to WWF.

http://www.straitstimes.com/Breaking%2BNews/SE%2BAsia/Story/STIStory_345976.html

http://www.bigcatrescue.org

Monday, March 02, 2009

Vanishing Species in Trouble w/ USDA

Davie exhibitor agrees to move big cats out, follow animal welfare rules

By David Fleshler | South Florida Sun-Sentinel
    March 2, 2009

DAVIE - A wildlife exhibitor in Davie has run into trouble with federal authorities for allegedly giving animals food contaminated with blood and maggots, failing to provide veterinary care and leaving tigers unprotected from the sun and rain.

Vanishing Species Wildlife Inc. leases land on Southwest 136th Avenue to house caged cougars, tigers, a lion, a bear, tortoises and other animals used in wildlife shows at street fairs, schools, churches and summer camps.

"We want to save as many animals as possible," co-founder Jeffrey Harrod told the Sun Sentinel at a wildlife festival in 2000. "I want to educate kids to stop destroying the environment."

Here's what he told an inspector from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as he ordered him off his property, according to court papers filed by the department: "You don't know s--- about animals and I don't f------ like you."

According to an Agriculture Department complaint, the nonprofit organization:

Lied to a department official that an ill African wildcat called a serval had been taken to the veterinarian and euthanized, when actually the animal died in her cage without receiving veterinary care. The organization failed to provide veterinary care to a sick tiger, which also died. It submitted a written program of veterinary care by forging a veterinarian's signature.

Failed to provide tigers with shelter from wind, rain and sun. Did not repair broken or rusted parts of enclosures. Did not maintain an adequate perimeter fence.

Despite repeated warnings, provided animals with unpalatable food, including meat contaminated with blood, dirt, flies and maggots.

"The gravity of the violations alleged in this complaint is great," states the court document , filed in June, accusing Harrod and his wife, Barbara, of violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act.

In a consent order signed Feb. 4, the Harrods neither admitted nor denied the charges. They agreed to pay a fine of $3,750, refrain from using abusive language with inspectors, follow animal welfare rules and sell, donate or move out lions, tigers and other large cats from their Davie compound by July 31.

Barbara Hartman-Harrod said that none of the charges are true and that they only signed the court order to avoid a costly legal fight. She blamed complaints from "disgruntled employees" and an Agriculture Department inspector who had a "personality dispute" with her husband. She said many of the issues actually involved their property in Palmdale, Fla., not Davie.

"This has been going on for several years, and they've been harassing us and driving us crazy," she said. "We've never had an animal get loose, we've never had anyone get bitten. We treat our animals very well."

They can't exhibit full-grown big cats anymore, she said, since the laws were tightened, so now they're just trying to give them a home.

After forwarding an interview request to her husband, she said he "really didn't want to talk to a reporter."

Although the Davie site is closed to the public, she allowed a reporter to visit. Near the entrance, a lioness named Savannah sat on a dirt floor in a chain-link enclosure, with a couple of balls and stuffed animals. When Harrod approached, the lioness rubbed up against the fence and allowed herself to be stroked.

In another cage, an adult black bear named Joshua sat and stared at his visitors. In the back, huge tigers paced rapidly back and forth near the wire mesh of their cages, most of which were about the size of a living room. Harrod said the cages meet the minimum legal size standard, 10 feet by 20 feet.

Despite the scathing federal reports, inspections by the state's Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission found that the animals appeared healthy and that the organization complied with the law, although they did note some violations of cage and food quality standards.

Nolan Lemon, spokesman for the Agriculture Department, said none of the agency's inspectors targeted the Harrods.

"We just follow the letter of the law, and the Animal Welfare Act is quite specific in terms of standards," he said. "We want to protect the health and safety of the animals, but make sure the general public is safe as well."

Asked why the department didn't take away Vanishing Species' license, he said, "It can be very difficult to lose a license."

Richard Farinato, senior director of the Humane Society of the United States, said the department has traditionally shown great reluctance to revoke licenses.

"Every effort is made to allow the client to mend his evil ways and go on his way," he said. "But the client is not the tiger or the leopard; the client is the owner."

David Fleshler can be reached at dfleshler@sunsentinel.com or 954-356-4535.

Check out the video at the link below.  It shows the tiny, cramped, barren cages and the kind of people who subject animals to that kind of existence.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/news/davie/sfl-flbanimals0302sbmar02,0,3984218.story

Check out the photos here:

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/news/davie/sfl-animal-cruelty-pg,0,2528792.photogallery

See who owns these animals in South Florida here:

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/broward/sfl-exotic-animals-database%2C0%2C4531696.htmlstory?appSession=38572078972504

Carole's Note:

The tiger in a shed and the bobcat in the tiny cage at the Animal Rescue Kingdom, owned by Diane Zandman at 10561 SW 67th Ct. Ocala, FL 34476, originated at Vanishing Species Wildlife Center.  When we tried to rescue the bobcat, Diane said we had to get permission from Vanishing Species' owner, Barbara Harrod, who gave us permission, but then Diane wouldn't allow Big Cat Rescuers to take the bobcat, after telling us we could, and having us drive two hours to her facility.  We require that she give up her license to own exotic cats, and she knew this in advance, having signed the documents, but then decided she didn't want to give up her license, just to give the bobcat a better home.

You can see the horrible conditions there at this link:

http://reporter.911animalabuse.com/_Tiger-in-Shed-Bobcat-in-Box/video/533587/23072.html

--
For the cats,

Carole Baskin, CEO of Big Cat Rescue
an Educational Sanctuary home
to more than 100 big cats
12802 Easy Street Tampa, FL  33625
813.493.4564 fax 885.4457

http://www.BigCatRescue.org
SaveTheBigCats@gmail.com

Sign our petition to protect tigers from being farmed here:

http://capwiz.com/bigcatrescue/issues/alert/?alertid=9952801&type=CU

This message contains information from Big Cat Rescue that may be
confidential or privileged. The information contained herein is intended
only for the eyes of the individual or entity named above.  You are hereby
notified that any dissemination, distribution, disclosure, and/or copying of
the information contained in this communication is strictly prohibited. The
recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments for the presence of
viruses. Big Cat Rescue accepts no liability for any damage or loss caused
by any virus transmitted by this e-mail.